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Controversy continues over proposed WSU medical school

Controversy continues over proposed WSU medical school

 The University of Washington released a scathing rebuttal this week to a report supporting the creation of a medical school for Washington State University, saying it contains “a number of deep flaws,” and is based on “faulty assumptions, omissions and erroneous data.”

WSU first approached consultant MGT of America in February to conduct a feasibility assessment for a new medical school based on the University's health sciences campus in Spokane. Specifically the assessment was to focus on the need for physicians in Eastern Washington, the best educational model to meet those needs, if current WSU resources were capable of creating a program to meet accreditation standards and the required time and resources to develop a new medical school.

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Grant County child hospitalized with possible enterovirus

Grant County child hospitalized with possible enterovirus

A Grant County child has been hospitalized with a severe respiratory that may be enterovirus D68. A test returned positive for enterovirus/rhinovirus, but was unable to distinguish between the two. Additional testing is being done at the Centers for Disease Control that will determine which it is, with results expected next week.

Grant County Health Officer Dr. Alexander Brezny issued a public health advisory to local healthcare providers and schools. The CDC has said this is a rapidly evolving situation. Previously EV-D68 has been rare in the U.S, but in other states the outbreaks are resulting in many children requiring ER visits and hospitalizations, mostly for breathing problems and severe asthma.

The virus spreads from person to person like a cold and has been causing mild to severe breathing illnesses (runny nose, cough, difficulty breathing) both with and without fever. Children with per-existing asthma may suffer worse infections. There is no vaccine or specific treatment for enteroviruses.

SCRAPS offering adoption special on cats

SCRAPS offering adoption special on cats

The Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS) is bursting at the seams with cats! According to Shelter Operations Manager Mary Reynolds-Paullin, SCRAPS has been inundated with cats all summer and now the other local rescue groups are full.

“Our cat room is overflowing with beautiful, adoptable cats that desperately need loving homes,” Reynolds-Paullin said.

SCRAPS is offering a great cat adoption special starting on Friday, September 12th and Saturday, September 13th. Cat adoption fees will be waived and cats and kittens can be adopted for just the price of a license ($15).

SCRAPS also reminds the public that they have spay/neuter vouchers available for both cats and dogs. For the price of a pet license, SCRAPS will provide you with a ‘dollars off’ coupon to have your pet spayed or neutered.

Blessings Under the Bridge honored by People magazine

Blessings Under the Bridge honored by People magazine

If you've picked up a copy of the most recent People magazine, you may notice a hometown connection.

In between the photos of celebrity weddings and fall fashions, a shout-out to Spokane natives Mike and Jessica Kovac and their charity – Blessings Under the Bridge.

The couple were on the verge of divorce when Jessica says she began distributing bagged lunches to the homeless in downtown Spokane. Eventually her husband joined her and realized their problems that felt so big could be fixed.

Mike and Jessica emptied their savings to found Blessings Under the Bridge and have since fed thousands of people and helped some find and furnish apartments.

You can learn more about the Kovac's and Blessings Under the Bridge in our Everyday Heroes section on KXLY.com.

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Avista safety tips during National Preparedness Month

Avista safety tips during National Preparedness Month

This month marks the 11th annual National Preparedness Month and creates an opportunity for Avista to remind customers about the importance of being prepared for unexpected emergencies, like the recent storms that rolled through sections of their Washington and Idaho services area.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency and Department of Homeland Security sponsor this national initiative and uses September to remind all Americans to take simple steps to prepare for emergencies at home, school, work and in our communities.

As we have experienced recently, weather events like summer storms can ravage entire communities with effects lasting for days. Being prepared for severe weather like thunderstorms, wind, ice and snow storms or other natural disasters can help our residents and their families deal with the results of such events.

Working 4 you: Be prepared for the cost of fall sports

Working 4 you: Be prepared for the cost of fall sports

There's been a lot of inspiration for young Washington kids in sports this year, with Clint Dempsey being the star of Team USA in the World Cup, and not to mention the Seahawks winning the Superbowl. But, if it's a child's first season playing sports, many parents may underestimate just how much it's going to cost.

Events like the Superbowl, the Olympics and the World Cup give aspiring athletes new heroes. Most children want to go out and play just like them, and parents are rarely going to hesitate, realizing the benefits that team sports offer.

"It's teamwork. You get to work together, and I always get to know the other team a lot," said Emma Pelletier, a youth soccer player.

Jahehi Burford, another youth soccer player added, "If you're a kid that doesn't talk in school, you can go to soccer, and you have many friends there you can just talk to."

And Soleil Brown, another youth soccer player, said, "I get to do things that I love, and I get to exercise too."

But what parents of kids playing sports for the first time might not realize is the costs can certainly add up.

Cathy McMorris Rodgers introduces new Military Outreach Liaison

Cathy McMorris Rodgers introduces new Military Outreach Liaison

Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers released a statement Thursday announcing retired Air Force service member and longtime veterans advocate John Davis as her new Veterans and Military Outreach Liaison.

“I am both humbled and honored to welcome John Davis to my team. Over the past four decades John has dedicated his life to serving our country, our military and our veterans, and his compassion for the Eastern Washington veteran community has impacted countless lives,” the congresswoman said.

Davis' role with the congresswoman's office will be to assist veterans with their claims and records, and provide support and information on how to navigate the VA system.

Davis enlisted in the Air Force in 1968 and served in many locations, including Fairchild Air Force Base in the 92 Munitions Maintenance Squadron. While assigned at Fairchild AFB, John graudated from Spokane Falls Community College and Eastern Washington University where he studied counseling and sciences.